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September 10– Friday, October 22, 2004

California Design 2004
Left Coast Artists on the Leading Edge
Furniture and Decorative Object Design for the New Century

FACT SHEET

California is home to many internationally recognized makers of
contemporary furniture and decorative objects. New works - in wood, clay, glass,
metal, fiber and new materials - from 75 of these designers and artists are
featured in “California Design 2004,” a juried showcase of the latest from the
Left Coast. The exhibited work reflects the lifestyle of both the artist and
the consumer, concerns about the natural environment, and the political and
economic climate of The Golden State. Imaginative, experimental and often
off-beat, “California Design 2004” presents pieces from many pioneers of California’s
contemporary craft movement as well as debut offerings from young
never-before-exhibited artists.

Work was chosen by Marc D’Estout, designer and Director of Department of Art
& Design, University of California at Santa Cruz. California Design 2004 is
designed by Ted Cohen and produced by Kathleen Hanna and Baulines Craft Guild.

Eleven California Design shows were held in Pasadena, California from 1954 to
1976. These exhibitions - that included hundreds of objects designed for
industry as well as individual works by craft artists - did a great deal to
increase public awareness and understanding of contemporary design and the value of
handmade objects. The inventive exhibition catalogs carried the message to the
East Coast and the world. In 1989, Eudora Moore, curator of the last three
California Design Exhibitions held in Pasadena, entrusted the project name to
the Baulines Craft Guild. California Design 2004 is the latest in a long line
museum and gallery exhibitions attempting to define and record the development
of this lively movement.

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PRESS RELEASE

California is home to many internationally recognized makers of contemporary
furniture and decorative objects. View the latest in furniture design and
decorative objects - imaginative, experimental and often off-beat - from 75 juried
artists at “California Design 2004.” “California Design 2004” is on view
September 10-October 22 at 600 Townsend Street in San Francisco. Admission is
free. For more information please telephone 415 458-3535 or click on
www.baulinescraftguild.org.

With new work from many pioneers of California’s contemporary craft movement
as well as debut offerings from young never-before-exhibited artists
“California Design 2004” reflects the lifestyle of both the artist and the consumer,
concerns about the natural environment, and the political and economic climate
of The Golden State. With an emphasis on the handmade, artists from across the
state are offering new ideas for chairs, tables, vases, dinnerware and
jewelry. Many of the spotlighted artists continue the exciting contemporary trend of
mixing traditional with new materials – from bamboo veneers to high-fire clay
s to spice bush branches to recycled plastics and resins.

The pieces featured in “California Design 2004” were chosen by Marc
D’Estout, designer and Director of Department of Art & Design, University of
California at Santa Cruz. The “California Design 2004” 9,000 square foot
indoor/outdoor exhibition space is designed by Ted Cohen. The event is produced by
Kathleen Hanna and Baulines Craft Guild.

From 1954 to 1976, eleven “California Design” shows were held in Pasadena,
California. These exhibitions, that included hundreds of objects designed for
industry as well as individual works by craft artists, did a great deal to
increase public awareness and understanding of contemporary design and the value
of handmade objects. The inventive exhibition catalogs carried the message to
the East Coast and the world. In 1989, Eudora Moore, curator of the last three
“California Design” exhibitions held in Pasadena, entrusted the project name
to the Baulines Craft Guild. “California Design 2004” is the latest in a long
line museum and gallery exhibitions attempting to define and record the
development of this lively and lauded movement.

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